Quotes by Nikola Tesla on Mama Tesla

Yes, I’m calling her that. You can’t stop me.
Square brackets are me.
You can see how important she was to him. Read the damn book (My Inventions) yourself.

I must trace to my mother’s influence whatever inventiveness I possess

My mother descended from one of the oldest families in the country and a line of inventors.”

My mother was an inventor of the first order and would, I believe, have achieved great things had she not been so remote from modern life and its multifold opportunities.  She invented and constructed all kinds of tools and devices and wove the finest designs from thread which was spun by her.  She even planted the seeds, raised the plants and separated the fibers herself.  She worked indefatigably, from break of day till late at night, and most of the wearing apparel and furnishings of the home was the product of her hands.  When she was past sixty, her fingers were still nimble enough to tie three knots in an eyelash.”

“Of all things I liked books the best.  My father had a large library and whenever I could manage I tried to satisfy my passion for reading.  He did not permit it and would fly into a rage when he caught me in the act.  He hid the candles when he found that I was reading in secret.  He did not want me to spoil my eyes.  But I obtained tallow, made the wicking and cast the sticks into tin forms, and every night I would bush the keyhole and the cracks and read, often till dawn, when all others slept and my mother started on her arduous daily task. [She knew] On one occasion I came across a novel entitled “Abafi” (the Son of Aba), a Serbian translation of a well known Hungarian writer, Josika. This work somehow awakened my dormant powers of will and I began to practise self-control.  At first my resolutions faded like snow in April, but in a little while I conquered my weakness and felt a pleasure I never knew before—that of doing as I willed.  In the course of time this vigorous mental exercise became second nature.  At the outset my wishes had to be subdued but gradually desire and will grew to be identical.  After years of such discipline I gained so complete a mastery over myself that I toyed with passions which have meant destruction to some of the strongest men. …. On frequent occasions he [father] gave vent to his anger and contempt but my mother was different.  She understood the character of men and knew that one’s salvation could only be brought about through his own efforts.  One afternoon, I remember, when I had lost all my money and was craving for a game, she came to me with a roll of bills and said, “Go and enjoy yourself.  The sooner you lose all we possess the better it will be.  I know that you will get over it.” She was right.  I conquered my passion then and there and only regretted that it had not been a hundred times as strong.  I not only vanquished but tore it from my heart so as not to leave even a trace of desire.  Ever since that time I have been as indifferent to any form of gambling as to picking teeth.”

“Regaining my senses I realized with consternation that I was unable to visualize scenes from my life except those of infancy, the very first ones that had entered my consciousness.  Curiously enough, these appeared before my vision with startling distinctness and afforded me welcome relief.  Night after night, when retiring, I would think of them and more and more of my previous existence was revealed.  The image of my mother was always the principal figure in the spectacle that slowly unfolded, and a consuming desire to see her again gradually took possession of me.  This feeling grew so strong that I resolved to drop all work and satisfy my longing.  But I found it too hard to break away from the laboratory, and several months elapsed during which I had succeeded in reviving all the impressions of my past life up to the spring of 1892.  In the next picture that came out of the mist of oblivion, I saw myself at the Hotel de la Paix in Paris just coming to from one of my peculiar sleeping spells, which had been caused by prolonged exertion of the brain.  Imagine the pain and distress I felt when it flashed upon my mind that a dispatch was handed to me at that very moment bearing the sad news that my mother was dying.  I remembered how I made the long journey home without an hour of rest and how she passed away after weeks of agony! It was especially remarkable that during all this period of partially obliterated memory I was fully alive to everything touching on the subject of my research.  I could recall the smallest details and the least significant observations in my experiments and even recite pages of text and complex mathematical formulae.”

Supposed skeptics don’t like to discuss his psychic visions but it was integral to his process.

“… I reflected that the conditions for a look into the beyond were most favorable, for my mother was a woman of genius and particularly excelling in the powers of intuition. …”

The ones Einstein called crucial to genius. When looking for his purpose;

“Up to that time I never realized that I possessed any particular gift of discovery, but Lord Rayleigh, whom I always considered as an ideal man of science, had said so and if that was the case, I felt that I should concentrate on some big idea. At this time, as at many other times in the past, my thoughts turned towards my Mother’s teaching. The gift of mental power comes from God, Divine Being, and if we concentrate our minds on that truth, we become in tune with this great power. My Mother had taught me to seek all truth in the Bible; therefore I devoted the next few months to the study of this work.”

One response to “Quotes by Nikola Tesla on Mama Tesla

  1. Pingback: Manosphere /fake MGTOW claim: Women can’t do science or Women can’t invent | Philosophies of a Disenchanted Scholar

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