The Transracial Adoption Paradox (2003)

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2366972/

The National Association of Black Social Workers (NABSW), for example, argued that transracial adoption was, in essence, a form of race and cultural genocide (i.e., children will not develop proper skills to survive in a racist society), and the NABSW passed a resolution in 1972 calling for an end to the transracial adoption of African American children. Native American opposition to the Indian Adoption Project on similar grounds led to its eventual dissolution with the Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA) of 1978 (Simon & Altstein, 2000). Social service agencies and organizations, including the CWLA, responded quickly by revising their standards for adoption to a preference for same-race families. The policy change led to a sharp decrease in the number of Black-White adoptions from 2,574 in 1971 to an estimated 1,400 in 1987 (Bachrach, Adams, Sambrano, & London, 1990; Simon & Altstein, 2000). There are no reliable past or present estimates for the number of domestic transracial adoptions that are not Black-White.

They’re 100% correct. It is.

Indict Jolie?
International kidnapping at least?

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One response to “The Transracial Adoption Paradox (2003)

  1. I’m not sure what I think of that, as a second generation adoptee (mother was, sister and I were) from the Creeks. I wouldn’t want to change where I am, but it was all pretty f’d up.

    Getting shipped to new england at fourteen, the rabbit culture was a shock. I believe I was a shock to them as well, being perfectly happy to take scalps.

    Still, of all the tribes the Creeks are doing very well. It wouldn’t have been a hardship to have finished growing up there.

1. Be civil. 2. Be logical or fair. 3. Do not bore me.

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