“Panic Attack”…. or Anger?

We need MRI studies. Amygdala and aggression arousal. Can they be differentiated from men with weakly controlled rage outbursts cycling with depression?

Otherwise it seems convenient panic attacks are the modern hysteria.

https://psychcentral.com/news/2012/12/05/link-between-anger-and-anxiety/48618.html

It would explain why they’re experiencing “anxiety” when it’s expected they’d feel anger.

Anyone deliberately mislabeling or lying about a diagnosis (malingering) is using a manipulation tactic.

https://therichardstraumaprocess.com/casestudies/teenage-female-experiencing-panic-attacks-anger-severe-anxiety-depression-low-self-esteem-eating-disorders/

“Panic attacks when feeling angry & frustrated.”

Common. They do under-diagnose female sociopathy and what they describe as panic would, in a man, be a tantrum or angry outburst. Anger attacks.

Sociopaths are not cool and calm like Dexter, they’re angry messes.

https://www.verywellmind.com/panic-attacks-and-anger-attacks-the-difference-2584386
https://www.calmclinic.com/anxiety/symptoms/anger

http://anxietynetwork.com/content/gad-and-anger
“A recent study examined anger and the role it plays in the maintenance of Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD). Researchers examined hostility, physical and verbal aggression, how anger is expressed, and how anger is controlled. More than 380 participants with GAD were tested on their responses to statements that were anger-related such as “I strike out at whatever infuriates me.” The study found that higher levels of anger were associated with worry and anxiety. In addition, hostility and internalized anger contributed to the severity of the participants’ GAD symptoms. Thus, internalized anger made generalized anxiety stronger. Anger fanned the flames of worry and anxiety. Researchers suggested that anger could be detrimental during the treatment of GAD, especially if it is not brought up and handled during the patient’s therapy.
Dr. Richards expresses it like this: You can never get better from any of the anxiety disorders by using another negative emotion. Any negative emotion (i.e.., anger) feeds and fuels other negative emotions (e.g.., anxiety). So, while it may be nice to think you can get better by being angry at anxiety, in fact all it does is make anxiety worse.”

Hold women accountable for their anger issues.

OT

Could low IQ people be said to have panic attacks?

There’s also a definite tendency to let people with more money off on a lighter diagnosis.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3269637/

“Relatively high anxiety in patients with GAD predicted high IQ”
Relatively.
“whereas relatively low anxiety in controls also predicted high IQ.”
Intelligent people aren’t neurotic messes. They’re confusing educated with intelligent again.

Contrary to the high IQ propaganda you can find on Google, a real study:
https://www.thecrimson.com/article/2008/12/2/scientists-tie-low-iq-to-disorders/

Researchers from the Harvard School of Public Health have concluded that children born with lower IQs possess higher risk of psychiatric disorders, according to a decades-long study of 1000 people in New Zealand. Children with lower IQ levels were more vulnerable to having chronic psychiatric disorders after the age of 32, researchers said. 

The study was conducted on a cohort of children born between 1972 and 1973 in Dunedin, New Zealand and first tested at age three.

The participants were assessed for psychiatric disorders at ages 18 through 32 by doctors without any knowledge of the cohort members’ IQ levels or psychiatric history.

“Lower childhood IQ predicted increased risk of schizophrenia, depression, and generalized anxiety disorder,” said lead researcher Karestan Koenen, assistant professor of society, human development, and health at the School of Public Health. “Individuals with lower childhood IQ also had more persistent depression and anxiety and were more likely to be diagnosed with two or more disorders in adulthood.” 

Although the exact mechanism through which childhood IQ may be linked to higher risk of adult anxiety disorders is not known, the researchers were capable of suggesting several potential explanations.

genes?

In their report, they theorize that lower childhood IQ might suggest varied levels in brain health that make the subject more exposed to certain mental disorders.

dysgenics

The researchers further said that people with lower IQ levels find it more difficult to cope with complex modern daily life, possibly making them more vulnerable to developing psychiatric symptoms. 

….

If they can’t cope, they should be in an asylum.

Researchers argue that the findings can be helpful in treating individuals with psychiatric disorders.

“Lower childhood IQ was associated with greater severity of mental disorders including persistence over time and having two or more diagnoses at age 32,” said Koenen. “Since individuals with persistent and multiple mental disorders are more likely to seek services, cognitive ability may be an important factor for clinicians to consider in treatment planning.” 

The researchers added, however, that they could not find any correlation between lower childhood IQ and panic disorder, simple phobia, obsessive-compulsive disorder or substance dependence disorders.

SSRIs are anger management pills

http://www.pnas.org/content/94/11/5939.full

The amine serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine creatinine sulfate complex (5HT)] has been linked to aggression in a wide and diverse range of species, including humans (1720). The nature of the linkage, however, is not simple, and it has proven difficult to unravel the role of the amine in the behavior. In vertebrates, lowered levels of 5HT (endogenous or experimentally induced) or changes in amine neuron function that lower the effectiveness of serotonergic neurons generally correlate with increased levels of aggression (1920) whereas in invertebrates, the converse is believed to be true (1113). Genetic alterations of amine neuron function also can change aggressive behavior in animals (2124) and in people (2527) although, again, in most cases, it is not clear how the genetic change is linked to the behavior. For example, in humans, a mutation leading to inactivation of one form of the enzyme monoamine oxidase leads to a particular form of explosive violent behavior (2627). Because this enzyme is believed to be involved in further metabolism or inactivation of amines, this defect should result in elevated levels of amines, as has been seen in a knockout mutation of the monoamine oxidase enzyme in mice (21). The behavioral manifestation, however, is that generally thought to be associated with lowered levels of 5HT. Finally, direct injections of amines like 5HT into animals also cause changes in aggression, but even here the relationships are complex. For example, in ants, injections of 5HT and its precursors lower interspecific aggressiveness toward intruders but raises intraspecies aggression (2829).

They don’t help with “most people”

https://www.spring.org.uk/2008/02/new-study-ssri-antidepressants-dont.php

A new study published today is sure to set off another storm in the ongoing debate about the widespread prescription of antidepressants. Professor Irving Kirsch at the University of Hull and colleagues in the US and Canada report that new generation ‘SSRI’ antidepressants like Prozac or Seroxat mostly fall, “below the recommended criteria for clinical significance” (Kirsch et al. 2008). In other words, the most modern drugs prescribed for depression generally don’t work.

 The study was particularly interested in whether the drugs had different effects on people with different levels of depression. Here is what they found:
  • Mild depression: not tested as mild depression is usually treated with a ‘talk therapy’ rather than antidepressants.
  • Moderate depression: antidepressants made “virtually no difference”.
  • Severe depression: antidepressants had a “small and clinically insignificant” effect.
  • Most severe depression: antidepressants had a significant clinical benefit – but see below…

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0014299905009817

Antidepressant treatments and human aggression

We need more studies on that.

Aggressive behaviour is associated with negative mood and poor impulse control. Serotonin has been specifically associated with impulse regulation and deficiencies in serotonin have been linked to impulsive aggression.

Or they could learn impulse control, like previous generations.

However, aggression occurs in a social context and noradrenaline has been implicated in social motivation. Both serotonergic and noradrenergic antidepressants may therefore be effective in reducing aggression. The evidence for the effects of antidepressants on aggression comes from a wide range of sources but there are few controlled trials or experimental studies. Current findings point to decreases in negative mood and anger attacks and positive changes in personality traits after antidepressant treatment.

fake changes

never letting them suffer, learn, grow and improve

no character development whatsoever

forced immaturity

Clinical studies in personality disorder patients have shown some efficacy for serotonergic antidepressants in reducing irritability and impulsive aggression. Experimental work in healthy volunteers has shown both serotonergic and noradrenergic antidepressants to increase assertiveness and affiliative behaviour. Both may therefore decrease aggression through different routes.

Not the same thing.

Asking your boss for a raise is different than threatening him if he doesn’t.

http://www.dana.org/Publications/Brainwork/Details.aspx?id=43750

Now, researchers at Cambridge University and UCLA have found that serotonin also plays a critical role in regulating emotions such as impulsive aggression during social decision making.

SSRI patients are still making self-destructive life choices.
It’s a band aid on a broken leg!

Impulsive aggression is the tendency to respond with hostility or aggression when faced with serious frustration.

character flaw

The researchers believe their results suggest that serotonin plays a critical role in social decision making by normally keeping aggressive social responses in check.

See: angry vegans.

Under normal circumstances, serotonin works in the frontal areas of the brain to inhibit the firing of the amygdala, the almond-shaped structure that controls fear, anger and other emotional responses.

*sarcastic clapping*

Wonder why so many of my generation are cunts?

The anger is their real personality, suppressed by the drug.

I say this from compassion, because in the eventual situation where the supply chain is interrupted for a few weeks, they’ll kill themselves in a fit of pique. (Directly or by picking fights).

Male borderlines

Borderline is already under-diagnosed in women, more often depression, histrionic personality, (ego, identity) anxiety or narcissism.

But male borderlines are under-diagnosed even more than that. Usually men are tarred as sociopaths (antisocial personality) if they feel empty, or narcissitic personality if they’re grandiose (faking it).

http://namimc.org/male-borderline-personality-disorder-know/

A lot of manosphere and self-proclaimed redpill types match this, and even complain when (other) borderlines are attracted to them, or plain narcissists (there is a co-dependency between the conditions in romantic attachments, the NPD feeds off the BPD’s attention and false identity is created like an ego plug, for both).

Red flags to look for include:

  1. Frequent romantic relationships (often too close together): Do you know a male who has been with tons of women? Did this guy feel guilty or did they feel admired? Believe it or not, some males with BPD symptoms will date multiple women (feel guilty later) and refuse to commit due to a fear of abandonment. Other males will “scare” their spouses away with their quick tempers, argumentativeness, and sometimes even physical aggression. An interaction with a male with BPD may include the individual saying any and everything to trigger their spouses anger. Their relationships may be frequent and too fast. Individuals with BPD tend to be emotional which is why some individuals pursue multiple relationships that begin too fast and end before you can blink.
  2. Drama laden behaviors and attitudes: Most of society, primarily men, would say that “women are dramatic.” Some women would agree. In fact, it is a natural thing for women to be emotional with all of the emotions and hormonal fluctuations. But for males, the drama would look at bit different. For example, I previous worked with a 13 year old male who would come to therapy idealizing me and his work with me almost all month until the final week of the month when he would become very detached emotionally and standoffish. He fluctuated between liking me and confiding in me, to rejecting my ideas and therapeutic support. During these “episodes,” he would also break up with a girl and pursue another. He would also reach out to old girlfriends via texting with the excuse that: “I didn’t end things right, I need to make it right.” This continued for years.
  3. Roller Coaster emotions, thoughts, and behaviors: Again, as stated above, most men are not dramatic but sometimes the way in which emotions are expressed can feel like multiple personalities. Men with BPD will often become “hot” and “cold,” change perspective quickly, or exhibit very angry and hostile emotions toward others. This is the type of person who will exhibit a consistent and stable pattern of behavior, perhaps even for a long time, and then quickly change into what seems like a completely different person. An example of this would be a teenager being a “daddy’s girl” one moment, and then later telling the father how awful of a person he is and how unfair his parenting is.
  4. Hot and Cold interactions with others:Some individuals with BPD really struggle with relationships and often have trouble with interpretation of comments, body language, and emotions. For example, a male with BPD might find it quite disturbing that his wife speaks to other men while in public. He might begin to behave oddly such as being emotionally distant, becoming easily angered, not openly communicating, or begin taking everything personally. This same man may later act as if nothing happened and instantly appear to be one of the most fair spouses you could ever have. The emotions of BPD are like a roller coaster at times and it can be difficult to determine what emotion the individual might exhibit from one moment to another.
  5. Frequent suicide attempts or SIB: It is a known fact within the world of psychology and psychiatry that individuals with suicidal ideations (i.e., thoughts), gestures, or threats will often use suicide as a way to manipulate their loved ones or somehow prove that they are “lovable.” For example, the man above on #4 might become so jealous of his wife talking to other men than he decides to tell his wife that he will kill himself if she does not refuse to talk to other men.In this case, suicidal thoughts, threats, or in gestures is used to manipulate someone else. However, there are individuals who are seriously considering suicide because the symptoms of BPD “causes” difficulties in various domains.The pain is so intensified including the fear of abandonment that suicidal thoughts may temporarily comfort the sufferer.
  6. Attention seeking behaviors: Some individuals with BPD (primarily adolescents with BPD traits) crave attention, even if it is negative. The loud attitude, the blatant and aggressive words, the criticism, the accusations of being unloved and abandoned all draw attention to the individual. Males who exhibit BPD traits will often cut themselves or harm themselves in some way and then draw attention to how they harmed themselves. Other males with BPD traits may engage in risky behaviors such as unprotected sex, having multiple mother of multiple children, domestically abusing his family, making threats to keep everyone afraid and confused, or entertaining a negative group of peers (e.g., gang involvement),
  7. Dependency/co-dependency: Co-dependency or dependency is often a very common symptom of BPD. As stated above, the fear of abandonment makes it difficult for individuals with BPD to maintain safe, healthy, an satisfying relationships. On the other hand, there may be times when someone connected to the individual with BPD begins to rely, emotionally and psychologically, on the individual with BPD. The relationship is dependent upon the other individual who may be just as (or more) emotionally and psychologically unstable.
  8. Anger outbursts but social charm: Many of us are used to hearing that sociopaths or narcissists are superficial, shallow, and manipulative. But we must also consider that an individual with BPD (who may also have other diagnoses) can become very angry to the point of manipulating situations or responding to confrontations/arguments inappropriately. Anger outbursts can occur more than we think in individuals with BPD.

To any kind of personality condition, they refuse to accept responsibility for their actions or the outcomes because it’s so integral to who they are, they cannot conceive other means. It will always be the fault of the Other e.g. so a gay BPD man will blame all Other man, a straight BPD man will blame all Other/ all women, see what I mean with the manosphere thing? Is that not exactly what they do?

Despite claiming to be alpha (no grit, no LT plans like a psychopath) and chill (apathetic), they frequently burst into rage online, in articles and videos and in person. They usually have domestic abuse accusations on file, but like a psycho, play victim. You can’t be the strong one and the victim. However, they’re highly emotional and try to talk out of this with rationalization, confusing it for rationality because again, they have no true identity so may think they’re ASPD and secretly getting one over on everything, but in truth they don’t even know what those things mean e.g. loyalty, love, rationality, they lack a sense of self like a baby.

PUA appears to be an excuse that all the antisocial behaviours are signalled as positive e.g.

I’m not a slut, I’m a stud!

Women don’t want me? Women can’t have me! Nobody can hold me down!

I’m not dramatic, I’m exciting!

Draining? You’ll miss me when I’m gone!

I’m not mean, I’m funny!

I treat them badly because they deserve it, and I deserve to be worshipped because I am Manly Man McAlpha!

I’m not lonely, I’m a lone wolf!

I could get any woman I want, they’d be so lucky to have a user like me.

When I’m cold, it’s cool. When a woman’s cold, she’s a frigid bitch and there’s something wrong with her.

Adult temper tantrums

Called it.

Seen At 11: Adults Throwing Temper-Tantrums Could Be Suffering From Disorder

h/t Anonymous Conservative

I know plenty online will be laughing at this, but consider how many men are triggered by a woman’s refusal to send nude photos like a whore and you’ll understand why this problem isn’t limited to SJWs. These adults should be held legally responsible for causing a public nuisance. It’s antisocial behaviour.

Expectation violation = Rage

Terms like ‘intermittent explosive disorder’, this already exists.

They are selfish and lack empathy. When attempts to control their environment fail, their emotional maturity drops back to toddler levels. Don’t blame the parents, these are adults we’re talking about and much like a toddler, these are also manipulation attempts trying to force other adults to acquiesce to their demands.. There are no excuses. If you can vote, you can sort your shit. This needs to be publicly recognized as controlling behaviour.

Video: Hidden Psychopathy + Sherlock/Moriarty

I’m going to do something here I’ve never done online before. This is how I pick up on stuff.
A casual linguistic analysis, an excerpt from this video, transcribed by me. And pop culture comparison for fun.
Key: Bold and italic, by me too, note for tone. (round bracket) implied, covert or omitted. [sq., clinical note, overt presentation]

Of note, ~9:00 in:-

(serotonin amelioration explanation)
…so Psychopaths will get very angry but they’ll stay angry. …I said when I get mad, I don’t show it to anybody. I said I could be furious at you and you’d never know. I show no anger whatsoever. I don’t show anxiety. I said first of all, you’ll never know. I can sit on it for a year or two or three or five. But I’ll get you. And I always do. And they don’t know where it’s coming from. They can’t tie it to the event and it (seemingly) comes out of nowhere. And something dramatic happens in their life but I’m very careful, almost pristine about it, that’s a fair response. So if somebody does something [DS: note linguistic distancing] you can do a lot, you know. [DS: linguistic hedge, appeal to popularity/commonality]. You can say anything to me and I won’t get mad, really. [superficial] Those things don’t get me mad. [unique triggers] Somebody’s trying to get me [challenge, disrespect] , it’s like another psychopath or another (…) you know, someone’s trying to mess with me [perception of threat]. I have uh, I have a high (standard) threshold [pattern-seeking, repetition of slight required], so many things really don’t get me mad. You can just about do anything. I’m pretty cool that way. [rarely emotionally involved personally or socially] But if you really do [personal attack, repeated or major, provocation] then I always get even [balance scales, sense of justice] and I’ll make sure [intellectual control] it’s the same sort of intensity [proportion, category] that their initial damage (caused). …I can stay cool and it’ll happen (inevitable) and they’ll look around –
What happened with their job, what happened with their family, what happened [I happened. Person as event/God.] they won’t know. [stealth] And they both said that’s psychopathic. That’s exactly it. …..
Really when I saw Dexter, I absolutely understood it, because he was being fair, he was being fair to the universe [moral code, higher power appeal] and the world of ethics of the universe he was absolutely fair. Morality wise not so much [minimisation] but I could really understand [empathise] that behaviour. [decision-making process]
……..It was always the most selfish behaviour. ….It gets worse than that. ….It would extend to everything I was doing. [global traits] …Everything I’m doing is maximally selfish. (tries to change) I said you know I don’t really mean it. My wife goes I don’t care. ….I couldn’t believe it. I thought, you see, I had taken the whole thing of empathy and meaning beyond what people behaviourally are asking for [deep, higher processing, sincerity in social observance of norms] … people said you’re trying and that’s all that matters. This really blew me away and I really still don’t understand it [DS: it’s interpersonal respect, respect for observance of norms]….

This is the living example of a successful sociopath (non-criminal, prosocial psychopath).
BBC’s Sherlock, continually selfish, would also meet this (before they made him mushy and weak for the fangirls in Series 3).

a-friend-an-enemy-oh-which-one bbc sherlockMan, how many people do you piss off???

Despite the writer’s insistence they haven’t written one, he is. He totally is. They’re just reading sociopath as a criminal. No no, ‘successful sociopath’. Successful. High-functioning, almost. If you were to apply functioning criteria to this condition, yes.

And this bundle of characteristics, as it were, makes them so dangerous. Calculating, ruthless, precise. Think Moriarty. No doubts over that one, but aren’t they similar?

I listen in for linguistic cues and quirks like this at cocktail parties, with surprising results.
This is why successful sociopaths are best in business. It’s the ideal set of traits. Look out for these clinical markers I pointed out in conversations with high-flyer types. Sometimes I announce to them on the quiet that I know what they are. Good times, good times.

no one ever gets me bbc moriarty sherlockCome on, it’s transparent as a pane of glass.

Science says: Self-control is biological, hereditary

research coverage here;

“people who are genetically predisposed toward aggression try hard to control their anger, but have inefficient functioning in brain regions that control emotions.

In other words, self-control is, in part, biological.”

It’s a very good article.

I looooooove being right, with appropriate datasets ofc