Told ya so

https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2018-06-05/millions-trust-ancestrycom-their-genetic-code-what-could-go-wrong

Except what I pointed out was worse.

https://disenchantedscholar.wordpress.com/2018/01/15/why-would-you-hand-over-your-dna/

It’s technically illegal too, since you cannot consent on behalf of your family, and it’s their data too.

And the CSI effect can bias court cases. Random matches are possible.

Fake DNA

https://www.nature.com/articles/gim201838

False-positive results released by direct-to-consumer genetic tests highlight the importance of clinical confirmation testing for appropriate patient care

published last month

also

https://www.technologyreview.com/the-download/610688/up-to-40-of-results-from-consumer-dna-tests-might-be-bogus/

 They found that 40 percent of the variants noted in the raw data were false positives—that is, they indicated that a particular genetic variant was present when it wasn’t….

In eight instances, third-party interpretation services misunderstood the variants present.

Misunderstood.

They’re an angsty character in a fanfic.

Alcohol, DNA mutation and evolution

https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/causes-prevention/risk/alcohol/alcohol-fact-sheet

Michael Douglas’ cancer was probably caused by alcohol.

All alcohol causes permanent DNA mutation. Over time it builds up.

Researchers have identified multiple ways that alcohol may increase the risk of cancer, including:

Alcoholic beverages may also contain a variety of carcinogenic contaminants that are introduced during fermentation and production, such as nitrosaminesasbestos fibers, phenols, and hydrocarbons.

Is there a racial difference?

You bet.

Can a person’s genes affect their risk of alcohol-related cancers?

A person’s risk of alcohol-related cancers is influenced by their genes, specifically the genes that encode enzymes involved in metabolizing (breaking down) alcohol (13).

For example, one way the body metabolizes alcohol is through the activity of an enzyme called alcohol dehydrogenase, or ADH. Many individuals of Chinese, Korean, and especially Japanese descent carry a version of the gene for ADH that codes for a “superactive” form of the enzyme. This superactive ADH enzyme speeds the conversion of alcohol (ethanol) to toxic acetaldehyde. As a result, when people who have the superactive enzyme drink alcohol, acetaldehyde builds up. Among people of Japanese descent, those who have this superactive ADH have a higher risk of pancreatic cancer than those with the more common form of ADH (14).

Another enzyme, called aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2), metabolizes toxic acetaldehyde to non-toxic substances. Some people, particularly those of East Asian descent, carry a variant of the gene for ALDH2 that codes for a defective form of the enzyme. In people who have the defective enzyme, acetaldehyde builds up when they drink alcohol. The accumulation of acetaldehyde has such unpleasant effects (including facial flushing and heart palpitations) that most people who have inherited the ALDH2 variant are unable to consume large amounts of alcohol. Therefore, most people with the defective form of ALDH2 have a low risk of developing alcohol-related cancers.

However, some individuals with the defective form of ALDH2 can become tolerant to the unpleasant effects of acetaldehyde and consume large amounts of alcohol. Epidemiologic studies have shown that such individuals have a higher risk of alcohol-related esophageal cancer, as well as of head and neck cancers, than individuals with the fully active enzyme who drink comparable amounts of alcohol (15). These increased risks are seen only among people who carry the ALDH2 variant and drink alcohol—they are not observed in people who carry the variant but do not drink alcohol.

Few epidemiologic studies have looked specifically at the association between red wine consumption and cancer risk in humans.

Video: Who owns your body? [DNA]

I’m not saying where you should look.

I’m not saying where you should pause this video to read carefully.

I’m not saying you shouldn’t become a guinea pig to any test, just know what the test really is about.
Taking whatever is unique about you, and buying it.

Plus, the other thing.

https://www.geneticsandsociety.org/article/dna-evidence-can-be-fabricated-scientists-showhttps://www.forensicmag.com/news/2015/02/dna-evidence-can-be-faked

“DNA is only as good as the records you keep.”

Experts asked What causes intelligence?

http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fpsyg.2016.00399/full

Gee, I wonder…

Education was rated by N = 71 experts as the most important cause of international ability differences. Genes were rated as the second most relevant factor but also had the highest variability in ratings. Culture, health, wealth, modernization, and politics were the next most important factors, whereas other factors such as geography, climate, test bias, and sampling error were less important. The paper concludes with a discussion of limitations of the survey (e.g., response rates and validity of expert opinions).

You can’t educate a dunce into a genius.

Note that the countries with the best of many of those factors? Have the highest IQs too. Almost like IQ is causing some of them….