Stealing intellectual property

Security issues, et tu?

That is an act of war. That is an invasion. Companies too. They’re the machine in war machine.

If you think that’s nothing, consider these things often have military applications. It doesn’t have to be obvious. Intellectual property is still property and the theft can net a lot of money. It means the R&D costs nothing (to the thief) so the profits are even higher. IP can be worth more than a jewelry heist or bank robbery. Or ten.

https://www.rt.com/news/436849-hackers-stealing-university-data-iran/

Imagine if the West had kept computers and other white technology to ourselves.

Ah, but “diversity is our strength”, isn’t it?

All this multicultural sharing has been so good for us!

We can trust our historic, low IQ bitter enemies because it’s the current year!

War is outlawed!

They have foreign students passing them system details, only way these hacks work.

Was Stormer hacked? [y/n]

http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/gadgets-and-tech/news/daily-stormer-anonymous-hack-cyber-attack-nazi-charlottesville-virginia-godaddy-a7891836.html

Why would the real Anonymous attack DS? Have you seen what they post on the chans?

On the other hand, I highly doubt Stormer care about sympathy?

I guess it’ll remain a mystery.

“The Daily Stormer post in question denigrated Heather Heyer, 32, who was fatally struck by a car allegedly driven by a man with white nationalist views, for her physical appearance and what it said were anti-white male views.”

Seriously, suck less.

Killing women because they don’t trust men proves them right.

http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/opdomesticterrorism-hacktivist-group-anonymous-shuts-down-charlottesville-city-website-ddos-1634857

Meanwhile, real Anony-chan hacked the Charlottesville website.

You know, something actually useful.

Now all I want for Christmas is more pre-released GOT episodes to piss off the producers.

There’s nothing wrong with my writing style

Please, America.

Do your research before calling others illiterate?

http://www.catb.org/jargon/html/writing-style.html

And explains a meme.

Another hacker habit is a tendency to distinguish between ‘scare’ quotes and ‘speech’ quotes; that is, to use British-style single quotes for marking and reserve American-style double quotes for actual reports of speech or text included from elsewhere. Interestingly, some authorities describe this as correct general usage, but mainstream American English has gone to using double-quotes indiscriminately enough that hacker usage appears marked [and, in fact, I thought this was a personal quirk of mine until I checked with Usenet —ESR] One further permutation that is definitely not standard is a hackish tendency to do marking quotes by using apostrophes (single quotes) in pairs; that is, ’like this’. This is modelled on string and character literal syntax in some programming languages (reinforced by the fact that many character-only terminals display the apostrophe in typewriter style, as a vertical single quote).”

There seems to be a meta-rule behind these nonstandard hackerisms to the effect that precision of expression is more important than conformance to traditional rules; where the latter create ambiguity or lose information they can be discarded without a second thought. It is notable in this respect that other hackish inventions (for example, in vocabulary) also tend to carry very precise shades of meaning even when constructed to appear slangy and loose. In fact, to a hacker, the contrast between ‘loose’ form and ‘tight’ content in jargon is a substantial part of its humor!

One of these is that TEXT IN ALL CAPS IS INTERPRETED AS ‘LOUD’, and this becomes such an ingrained synesthetic reflex that a person who goes to caps-lock while in talk mode may be asked to “stop shouting, please, you’re hurting my ears!”.”

“There is a semantic difference between *emphasis like this* (which emphasizes the phrase as a whole), and *emphasis* *like* *this* (which suggests the writer speaking very slowly and distinctly, as if to a very young child or a mentally impaired person). Bracketing a word with the ‘*’ character may also indicate that the writer wishes readers to consider that an action is taking place or that a sound is being made. Examples: *bang*, *hic*, *ring*, *grin*, *kick*, *stomp*, *mumble*.”

“Hackers also mix letters and numbers more freely than in mainstream usage. In particular, it is good hackish style to write a digit sequence where you intend the reader to understand the text string that names that number in English. So, hackers prefer to write ‘1970s’ rather than ‘nineteen-seventies’ or ‘1970’s’ (the latter looks like a possessive).”

It should also be noted that hackers exhibit much less reluctance to use multiply-nested parentheses than is normal in English. Part of this is almost certainly due to influence from LISP (which uses deeply nested parentheses (like this (see?)) in its syntax a lot), but it has also been suggested that a more basic hacker trait of enjoying playing with complexity and pushing systems to their limits is in operation.”

“Perhaps in response to this, experienced netters often display a sort of conscious formal politesse in their writing that has passed out of fashion in other spoken and written media (for example, the phrase “Well said, sir!” is not uncommon).

Many introverted hackers who are next to inarticulate in person communicate with considerable fluency over the net, perhaps precisely because they can forget on an unconscious level that they are dealing with people and thus don’t feel stressed and anxious as they would face to face.”

Don’t be a Twitter bitch and correct others’ form when you don’t understand the jokes.
I’m not illiterate in my native tongue. I’m not stupid. You are.