High IQ, low common sense of minimum wage

http://www.unz.com/freed/capitalism-and-the-minimum-wage-i-got-mine-screw-you/

It’s a demographic problem. You could cite HBD.

Traceable by national IQ.

Being tied to economic prosperity. Civic participation. Prosociality.

On the abstract plane, it’s a social problem. Politicians give the proles what they want, disproportionate to their current contributions. They’re being treated as more important than they are, based on their historical value (prior to mechanization and the rise of IT).

The middle class are signalling to suppress the strivers from overtaking their own 1-2 kids.
The childless ones are signalling because a dumpy middle class blogger hashtagging about refugees like the modern fainting couch gets more social cred than a 12 hour a day factory worker. Which one gives back to the country?

The upper class abandoned noblesse oblige and the upper class by occupation prefer obscurity to the vagaries of fame. The lumpenprole expect gadgets made well and cheaply and will force the Government to regulate the manufacturers into oblivion in this quest.

A basic wage, guaranteed bribe income would come in, if there existed the funds.
No, producers are taxed to the hilt, as is.

It comes down to a basic fact: people are not the same.

The high IQ deserve 100% of the fruit to their labour, as does the low IQ.
By comparison, one has more, but only because one provided more.

Inequality is a natural law.

The heuristic link between respect, status and income

Spoiler: It’s a proxy for class.

http://www.thebookoflife.org/why-we-look-down-on-people-who-dont-earn-very-much/

…Such an intuitive emotional response to wages operates with a background economic theory, which we may never describe to ourselves directly but which could in fact be stated as follows: a person’s wages are determined by the scale of their social contribution….

The future of employment: how suspectible are jobs to computerisation?

http://www.oxfordmartin.ox.ac.uk/downloads/academic/The_Future_of_Employment.pdf

Answer: Very.

Based on these estimates, we examine expected impacts of future computerisation on US labour market outcomes, with the primary objective of analysing the number of jobs at risk and the relationship between an occupation’s probability of computerisation, wages and educational attainment. According to our estimates, about 47 percent of total US employment is at risk. We further provide evidence that wages and educational attainment exhibit a strong negative relationship with an occupation’s probability of computerisation.

TLDR: If you’re low-IQ, you’re fucked.