Scientists can make you unlearn

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/10/181025142023.htm

No more noticing things.

Intended long-term application:
“unlearn the association”

How long until this is compulsory for badthink?

Literal brainwashing. Scrub the hatefacts away!

So…. does this apply to sexuality? No?

Can we convince socialists that it has been tried? Most notably by Uncle Adolf.

Sorry liberals, students need rote and repetition

It works and it’s the same reason Asia is trashing the West.

They are big on rote.

http://nautil.us/issue/17/big-bangs/how-i-rewired-my-brain-to-become-fluent-in-math-rd
“Worse, students often believe they understand something when, in fact, they don’t. By championing the importance of understanding, teachers can inadvertently set their students up for failure as those students blunder in illusions of competence.”

Oh look, all the problems and here’s the source.

I don’t think it’s inadvertent.
Understanding concepts is lazy introductory work. They’re trying to turn STEM into something like English lit, where your ability to blag counts for something.

“I couldn’t help but reflect back on the West Point-trained engineers I’d worked with in the Army. Their mathematically and scientifically based approach to problem-solving was clearly useful for the real world—far more useful than my youthful misadventures with math had been able to imagine.”

The sound of liberal arts majors weeping.
What goes unmentioned is that high neural plasticity exists in the innately intelligent. Stupid people are stuck and past a certain age, can’t learn new tricks. Considering the low IQ of Education majors, perhaps they’re literally incapable of teaching these things? Wouldn’t we have to fire them? Or pay them based on performance?

“I was beginning to intuit that the sparse outlines of the equation were like a metaphorical poem, with all sorts of beautiful symbolic representations embedded within it.”

The liberal arts refuses to believe other subjects possess emotion. Or beauty.

“Time after time, professors in mathematics and the sciences have told me that building well-ingrained chunks of expertise through practice and repetition was absolutely vital to their success.”

Lazy teachers screaming in the distance.
It’s very simple.
Go back to the old repetition or don’t bother sending the kids to school because they’ll literally forget everything over summer anyway.

Paper: Sex differences in the human amygdala

http://languagelog.ldc.upenn.edu/myl/ldc/llog/Brizendine/Hamann2005.pdf

The amygdala is a structure in the temporal lobe that has long been known to play a key role in emotional responses and emotional memory in both humans and nonhuman animals. Growing evidence from recent neuroimaging studies points to a new, expanded role for the amygdala as a critical structure that mediates sex differences in emotional memory and sexual responses. This review highlights current findings from studies of sex differences in human amygdala response during emotion-related activities, such as formation of emotional memories and sexual behavior, and considers how these findings contribute to the understanding of behavioral differences between men and women. Clinical implications for the understanding of sex differences in the prevalence of affective and anxiety disorders are discussed, and future directions in the study of the amygdala’s role in human sex differences are outlined.

If this is ringing bells, Anonymous Conservative discussed amygdala damage in liberals and feminists.
Claims of anxiety disorders and PTSD? Yup. Starting to make sense, isn’t it?

The science of the mind palace

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-12-brain-storage-capacity-memories.html

Cerebellum heavy.

“We investigated whether these memories overlapped across some rooms, but all of the memories were completely independent,” said the paper’s first author, Charlotte Alme. “This indicates that the brain has an enormous capacity for storage. The ability to create a unique memory or map for every locale explains how we manage to distinguish between very similar memories and how the brain prevents us from mixing up events.”

Alme says their findings also help explain why a specific memory trick called “the method of loci” works. This technique involves making a connection between things that you want to remember and places that you know quite well. By associating individual memories with different rooms in your house, for example, you can more easily recall what you need to remember by mentally walking through your house and visiting each room.

“Our paper shows that (and most likely humans) have a map for each individual place, which is why the method of loci works,” she said. “Each place (or room in your house) is represented by a unique map or memory, and because we have so many different maps we can remember many similar places without mixing them up.”

…that the findings were important for understanding episodic memory, or memories that are formed from autobiographical experiences.

Tease.

Memory molecule discovered

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/11/141113152916.htm

Is it possible to change the amount of information the brain can store? Maybe, according to a new international study led by the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC). Their research has identified a molecule that puts a brake on brain processing and when removed, brain function and memory recall is improved. Published in the latest issue of Cell Reports, the study has implications for neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative diseases, such as autism spectral disorders and Alzheimer’s disease.

“Previous research has shown that production of new molecules is necessary for storing memories in the brain; if you block the production of these molecules, new memory formation does not take place,” says RI-MUHC neuroscientist, Dr. Keith Murai, the study’s senior author and Associate Professor in the Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery at McGill University.

Fresh cells, fresh data.

“Our findings show that the brain has a key protein that limits the production of molecules necessary for memory formation. When this brake-protein is suppressed, the brain is able to store more information.”

Nothing is that simple in the brain there must be a downside.

“Future research in this area could be very interesting,” he adds. “If we can identify compounds that control the braking potential of FXR1P, we may be able to alter the amount of brain activity or plasticity. For example, in autism, one may want to decrease certain brain activity and in Alzheimer’s disease, we may want to enhance the activity. By manipulating FXR1P, we may eventually be able to adjust memory formation and retrieval, thus improving the quality of life of people suffering from brain diseases.”

And wipe memories a la Men in Black.