Women’s role in the workplace and history

http://uncabob.blogspot.co.uk/2015/08/feminizing-decline.html

The most important job in the history of the world is making and raising better people for the world. You can’t really top that for a purpose, the gift of Life. Ancient societies used to worship women for this power.

It’s the most difficult job because quality is hard to ensure. It’s also vital to a better future.

And look at the Spartan women – one job they had, to make little Spartans, they had one job, and they didn’t do it. And everyone died. This is left out of the feminist propaganda. 

A theme that could be applied to this blog: smug

I see other women my own age running about like headless chickens saying “I want to save the world” and I have to point out, 1. that’s impossible, 2. it isn’t a pleasant task (wouldn’t it involve mass-murdering all the evil people? the simplest thing?) and 3. surely the best one person can do is become The World to another person aka children?

As you can imagine, precisely none of this gets through.

STFU and pay attention to the truth you little bitches we are trying to help you!

As a rule, I don’t explain myself twice to stupid people who don’t deserve to reproduce if they can’t understand something the first time around.

Having it All is a Middle Class Myth

http://conservativewoman.co.uk/louise-kirk-women-cannot-have-it-all-without-damaging-their-families-and-homes/

They don’t seem to have noticed how middle-class they are, these female authors telling us that we can have our children, a full-time job, and love it.

Now, don’t get me wrong. I am all for women having careers if they want to. We need female doctors, teachers, shopkeepers, cleaners, you name it, to keep our society human. Nor am I against the middle-class. I belong there myself. What I do object to is assuming that all women are the same, and that any woman can “have it all” without damage to family and home…

They outsource and have servants. There aren’t enough hours in the day. I’d rather be a poor worker than a poor mother. Mother is a valuable and crucial job itself. It should be respected.

uhuh hmm o really rlly doubt eyebrow flash lara croft

Forgive the dejected tone, I’ve had the stuffing knocked out of me by a combination of work duties, paperwork errors, EU bureaucracy including the CHR (long story), family complaints, friends attention-seeking because it’s summer, the police (not a bad thing), noisy neighbours currently blasting bad techno music, that SCOTUS rainbow crap on social media, a somewhat minor health quibble and another redpill writer channelling Freud at me. Within the past few days.  I am exhausted. I want to curl up in a darkened room and forget the world exists.

It used to be that all working class women were working mothers. They had to be. They’d scoff if told that was a choice or a good thing.

Older mothers pass risk to their child

http://uk.businessinsider.com/consequences-of-having-kids-late-in-life-2015-6?r=US

biology is sexist

/sarc

…Research has suggested that children born to older women are likely to have shorter lives. In a study of 200 years of demographic data about a large group of Swedes, mother’s age at birth was one of the most significant non-external factors affecting how long a person lived, along with the mother’s lifespan.

It’s no shock the genes a mother passes down will affect her child’s lifespan. But in addition to genes, mothers pass down a crucial cellular component called mitochondria. As Dr. Martin Wilding proposes in the journal Fertility and Sterility, published by the American Society for Reproductive Medicine, children born from older mothers could receive compromised mitochondria in their cells — shortening their lives….

Men don’t get off the hook though. Past 40, they pass on higher risk of mental illness.

A mother’s love confers measurable brain benefits

This is why so many kids are screwed up.

study

“According to senior study investigator and neurobiologist Regina Sullivan, PhD, whose previous research in animals showed how maternal interactions influenced gene activity in the infant brain, the latest study offers an even more profound perspective on maternal caregiving.

“Our research shows how in mammals the mother’s sensory stimulation helps sculpt and mold the infant’s growing brain and helps define the role played by ‘nurturing’ in healthy brain development, and offers overall greater insight into what constitutes good mothering,” says Sullivan, a professor at the NYU School of Medicine and its affiliated Nathan S. Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research. “The study also helps explain how differences in the way mothers nurture their young could account, in part, for the wide variation in infant behavior among animals, including people, with similar backgrounds, or in uniform, tightly knit cultures.”

“There are so many factors that go into rearing children,” says lead study investigator Emma Sarro, PhD, a postdoctoral research fellow at NYU Langone. “Our findings will help scientists and clinicians better understand the whole-brain implications of quality interactions and bonding between mothers and infants so closely after birth, and how these biological attachment behaviors frame the brain’s hard wiring.””