Pathogens causing psychology issues again: rage

Intermittent Explosive Disorder, this time. Explains those dumb enough to protest Trump rallies.

http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/rage-disorder-linked-with-parasite-found-in-cat-feces/

Have you ever seen an angry rat? It chews through things and makes a lot of noise. Attracts predators. It’s like a temper tantrum or narcissistic rage.

In the study of more than 350 adults, those with a psychiatric disorder called Intermittent Explosive Disorder, or IED, were twice as likely to have been infected by the toxoplasmosis parasite compared with healthy individuals with no psychiatric diagnosis.

The study adds to a growing body of evidence suggesting that toxoplasmosis — usually a mild or nonsymptomatic infection from a protozoan parasite called Toxoplasma gondii — may somehow alter people’s brain chemistry to cause long-term behavior problems. Previous studies have linked toxoplasmosis to schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, impulsivity and suicidal behavior.

And there are more chronic issues coming out as affected. I wonder if those people had a tendency toward self-delusion prior to infection…

http://neurosciencenews.com/microbes-alzheimers-neurology-3826/

It’s almost like the brain is bathed in a chemical vat for subsistence…

facepalm leslie howard

Are polygyny, promiscuity, hypergamy and cuckoldry pathogenic?

http://www.unz.com/pfrost/first-sexual-transmissibility-and-then/

Yes, why aren’t there studies of vaginal bacteria cultures? Doctors already take millions of samples.
I would also like to see male sample studies from STD checks to ascertain % transmission. As do the men, I would imagine.

Is this why feminists are insistent upon receiving oral? Subconsciously trying to pass on promiscuity or cuckoldry-causing strains?

dean that's enough no more internet laptop shut no no no nuhuh supernatural

This is too much of a fuck-mind to consider all at once. It sounds scarily probable.

Contagious cancers in humans? STCs?

http://guardianlv.com/2014/02/contagious-cancer-in-humans/

I know it’s Guardian but this one is science.

In full;

Transmissible venereal tumor (TVT) is an 11,000 year old cancer, says Dr. Elizabeth Murchison, lead researcher with Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute. They decoded the DNA of the tumor taken from an affected dog and not only discovered the cancer’s historical age, but also its origin, a husky-like primitive canine. The cancer literally “jumped into other dogs”, transforming (or mutating) a million times over the centuries. TVT is a sexually transmitted, highly contagious cancer. The question is raised, are there contagions that cause cancer in humans?

“The genome of the transmissible dog cancer will help us to understand the processes that allow cancers to become transmissible,” said Prof Sir Mike Stratton, Director of the Sanger Institute.

Helen Briggs with the London BBC says, “this ancient cancer existed in an isolated group of dogs until only 500 years ago.” The most supported explanation is that our early sea-faring explorers, who were often accompanied by hunting dogs, came into contact with the infected canines. When they were discovered, the travelers either boarded these dogs on their ship, or the infected dogs mated with the travelers’ dogs prior to their departure.

So how does this translate for a human’s health?

The American Cancer Society makes it very clear that a healthy person cannot catch cancer from someone who has cancer. Researcher at the ACS say there is no evidence that proves cancer can spread by close contact, sharing utensils, or walking in the same vicinity as a sick person.

No evidence isn’t the same as impossible.
It means you haven’t studied it, because ethics.

However, cancer causing organisms can exist and increase your chances of acquiring the disease.

Carcinogens. They don’t increase the risk, you catch them, or you don’t. When you do, they might trigger or cause cancer.

The viruses that have proven to be associated with various cancers are the human papilloma virus, Epstein-Barr virus, hepatitis B and C, herpes simplex virus, and human T-lymphotrpic virus-1.

That list is WAY, way too short.
Browse this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_human_diseases_associated_with_infectious_pathogens and consider how likely it is to be the tip of the iceberg. “Some estimates currently attribute 15% to 20% of all cancers to infectious pathogen causes.
Why don’t they like admitting this? Antibiotics, Doctors’ BFF, have downsides, who knew?

The viruses named are only some of the organismal agents that increase your risk of cancer. There is also a bacterium, Helicobacter pylori, that has been linked to stomach cancer. Not only has the H. pylori bacterium been found associated with this disease, but in 80 percent of stomach ulcer cases, H. pylori is the cause (2005 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine winners, Dr. Barry J. Marshall and Dr. Robin Warren). It is not exactly known how the H. plyoi bacterium is spread, but some actually view this as proof that some cancer can be contagious in humans as well.

It could get there literally at any point, from birth, food, eating with the fingers……….

Finally, the last cancer causing (or influencing) organism on the list by the American Cancer Society is the parasite. Because there is not much information on the ACS’s website for this correlation, Dr. Simon Yu explains her take on parasites, inflammation and degenerative disease. Many doctors have known for a very long time there is a relationship between infection and cancer.

Could’ve fooled us.

Yu introduces Jean Marie Houghton, MD, Ph. D from the University of Massachusettes Medical School who has found that infectious microbes are hidden by inflammation, and in this toxic environment cancer cells can grow. Low-grade fever is one of the signs of infection, but this can be overlooked for a number of years leading to disease and chronic illness like cancer.

There is a bridge between Dr. Simon Yu’s research and the research done at the American Cancer Society. The ACS clearly states that the effect which germs play on cancer in people is an indirect role. Germs will cause an inflammatory response and will weaken a person’s immune system. Cancer is usually caused by mutations in our DNA from sun exposure, or cigarette smoke, car oil, and anything named to be a carcinogen (or have YET to be named).

Reassuring.
It isn’t the mutations actually, it’s the body’s inability to clear them as usual.

Does canine cancer directly affect humans in anyway? Many hope not, but the finding of a cancer with a DNA structure so unique will have researchers scrambling to find funding for future research. It also brings to light the knowledge and research already available for decades about infection and cancer.  Is cancer contagious? For some species and in some unique circumstances the answer is, yes. And in humans, the causes of some cancers are currently known to be contagious.

A great evolutionary explanation for why normal people avoid those with multiple STDs (sluts) like The Plague.

Microbes are more interesting than people, to people

from an Oxford geneticist, good-good;

Human genetics is microbial genomics

“Never mind about sequencing your own genome. Only 10% of cells on your “human” body are human anyway, the rest are microbial. And their genomes are far more interesting.

For one thing, there’s a whole ecosystem out there, made up of many species. Typically a person harbours 1,000 or more different species in their gut alone. For another, a person’s health is to a large part determined by the microbes that live on their body, whether that be as part of a long-term commensal relationship or an acute pathogenic interaction.

With 20% of the world’s deaths still attributable to infectious disease, the re-emergence of ancient pathogens driven by ever-increasing antibiotic resistance, and the UK’s 100K Genome Project– many of which will have to be genomes from patients (i.e. microbes) rather than patients’ own genomes given its budget – pathogen genomics is very much at the top of the agenda.

So what do pathogen genomes have to tell us?

  • Transmission. British researchers have been leading the use of genomics for routine “microbial forensics” in the NHS. Pioneering studies in Oxford and Cambridge focusing on the hospital-associated pathogens Staphylococcus aureus and Clostridium difficile have demonstrated how real-time genomics will revolutionize medical microbiology by detecting outbreaks as they occur.
  • Antibiotic resistance. Individual patients will benefit from pathogen genomics through accurate prediction of antibiotic resistance profiles. Already whole-genome sequencing outcompetes conventional techniques in speed and cost for some pathogens. High accuracy has been demonstrated in Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae, pathogens in which the recent rise of antibiotic resistance has been particularly alarming.
  • Within-host evolution. For the first time genomics has detailed the microevolution of bacteria within the human body, revealing parallel evolution across patients in an outbreak of Burkholderia dolosa in cystic fibrosis patients, and an excess of protein-truncating mutations associated with disease progression in chronic Staphylococcus aureus carriage, underlining the potential of the body’s natural flora to evolve and ultimately subjugate its host.
  • Disease severity. Pinpointing the genetic basis of important microbial phenotypes – principal among which being disease severity – is the next big challenge for pathogen genomics. In other words, pathogen genome-wide association studies (pathogen GWAS). While much is known about the molecular mechanisms of virulence in microbes, population-based studies that ask why some bacteria make people more sick, or sick more often, are almost entirely lacking. By distinguishing hypervirulent from avirulent strains, and unearthing new avenues for drug design, pathogen GWAS has the potential to radically impact public health policy and individual patient management.

Important obstacles still lie in the way of genome-wide association studies in pathogens, because of fundamental differences between humans and microbes in the way they reproduce and exchange genetic material. But these challenges can be overcome through a detailed understanding of microbial population structure that whole genome sequencing is giving us.

Pathogen genomics is gathering pace – in the Modernising Medical Microbiology consortium alone we have sequenced over 15,000 bacterial genomes in the last 3 years – and ambitious projects such as 100K Foodborne Pathogen Genome Project at UC Davis aim to sequence many more. With such momentum, and innovation in our methods of analysis, it is only a matter of time before we begin making giant inroads into understanding the genetic architecture of infectious disease.”

As the science of genetics progresses, it will render itself largely obsolete.
Once everything is sequenced and explained in a comprehensive database, there won’t be much to do.
It will knock out a few politically correct falsehoods in the way, though.

 

The link between male sexual abuse history and homosexuality

study here behind a paywall (you know, the connection people deny has ever been researched)

Complete abstract;

“Existing cross-sectional research suggests associations between physical and sexual abuse in childhood and same-sex sexual orientation in adulthood. This study prospectively examined whether abuse and/or neglect in childhood were associated with increased likelihood of same-sex partnerships in adulthood. The sample included physically abused (N = 85), sexually abused (N = 72), and neglected (N = 429) children (ages 0–11) with documented cases during 1967–1971 who were matched with non-maltreated children (N = 415) and followed into adulthood. At approximately age 40, participants (483 women and 461 men) were asked about romantic cohabitation and sexual partners, in the context of in-person interviews covering a range of topics. Group (abuse/neglect versus control) differences were assessed with cross-tabulations and logistic regression. A total of 8% of the overall sample reported any same-sex relationship (cohabitation or sexual partners). Childhood physical abuse and neglect were not significantly associated with same-sex cohabitation or sexual partners. Individuals with documented histories of childhood sexual abuse were significantly more likely than controls to report ever having had same-sex sexual partners (OR = 2.81, 95% CI = 1.16–6.80, p ≤ .05); however, only men with histories of childhood sexual abuse were significantly more likely than controls to report same-sex sexual partners (OR = 6.75, 95% CI = 1.53–29.86, p ≤ .01). These prospective findings provide tentative evidence of a link between childhood sexual abuse and same-sex sexual partnerships among men, although further research is needed to explore this relationship and to examine potential underlying mechanisms.”

I disagree with the sampling (inc. ambiguous “neglect”) but I haven’t seen the datasheets so I can’t be sure.

The first p-value is proof enough for a causative link to be made. 0.05 is the standard level.
The second is gold, 0.01 is definitive, as close to a certainty as social science psychology (attraction study) gets.

I highlighted male because it is interestingly a male-only connection. This is consistent with a pathogenic explanation of male homosexuality switching the response patterns of the hypothalamus from normal, reversed (female as in-utero hormone exposure instead). HBD chick here and Jayman here. Wouldn’t it be ironic if after all this complaining they weren’t born that way?

I see this probable explanation in a dispassionate, empirical way. At worst, I feel a small amount of pity for the suffering caused by this. However, if true, the gay male community should be frightened of a possible vaccine being developed. Most of the world would use one.

If you think there is no precedent for an invasive pathogen creating an immune response that changes hypothalamic function: here and here, and here’s a psychologist discussing the necessity of the brain segment for sexual attraction. Think for yourself.