BDSM changes your brain

http://www.mercatornet.com/articles/view/hooked_up_and_tied_down_the_neurological_consequences_of_sadomasochism

….In The Brain That Changes Itself, psychiatrist Norman Doidge summarizes research on the neurobiological aspects of sexual development. He writes: “The human libido is not a hardwired, invariable biological urge but can be curiously fickle, easily altered by our psychology and the history of our sexual encounters,” and he goes on to conclude: “Sexual taste is obviously influenced by culture and experience and is often acquired and then wired into the brain.”

Examples of cultural pushes into fetish/unnatural sex: spanking from public schoolboys in the 19th century, oral during the 50/60s with the pressure to perform for a boyfriend before marriage, and most harmful of the three from an STD perspective, nature’s petri dish anal ‘sex’ since the 90s promotion of the ‘gay lifestyle’.

With BDSM, the story of the brain gets even more complicated. Here, a person is not just forming neural networks or brain maps in the areas of the brain responsible for sexual interest, sexual arousal, sexual climax, and so on. With BDSM, a person is fusing distinct neural networks that were meant to operate separately…..

I am awed and cowed by sublime perfection.

Whenever a feminist tries the “don’t knock it until you’ve tried it” lie/line of “pushing boundaries”, “exploring oneself” and “there are no limits, it’s harmless”, bear this type of research in mind. You know, science. Medicine.

Human beings have neural networks related to sexual behavior, and these are shaped in subtle ways by our sexual experiences. We have separate neural networks related to anger and aggression, and these are shaped and strengthened when people engage in violent or domineering behaviors. We have still more separate brain maps for fear and anxiety, which are shaped and reinforced by frightening or anxiety-provoking experiences.

If you think about these three emotional experiences—sexual arousal, aggression, and fear—they are typically quite distinct emotional experiences. There is some overlap between them in terms of physical or bodily response: all three, for example, involve increases in heart rate, respiratory rate, and blood pressure, because all three involve activation of the sympathetic nervous system. And yet, for most healthy individuals, sexual arousal, aggression, and fear remain distinct emotional, cognitive, and physical experiences. This is, I will suggest, a good and healthy thing.

You shouldn’t need a further high from Nature’s own ultimate high.

So these neural networks and these experiences normally remain distinct—unless our experiences begin to fuse them together. When this fusion happens, the brain gets confused…