White liberal teachers flee diversity

https://www.theguardian.com/education/2019/nov/13/why-british-teachers-fleeing-overseas-international-schools

Signs of degeneration.

Costing up to £100,000 for an academic year, the Institut auf dem Rosenberg is more than twice as expensive as Eton college and educates the offspring of some of the wealthiest people in the world. Most of whom, it turns out, will be taught by teachers who trained in the cash-strapped classrooms of UK state schools.

Why they can’t talk about classism.

Those teachers who find themselves in Rosenberg’s five-star setting are a small subset of the thousands leaving their students in Oldham and Lewisham, Liverpool and Leicester, and heading for Switzerland, China, Canada, Dubai, Australia, Thailand, Mexico, Nepal and numerous other international education destinations.

China huh?

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/nov/13/two-people-diagnosed-with-pneumonic-plague-in-china

The 230 pupils of more than 40 different nationalities are just back after their half-term break – the younger children are cute and chatty, while the older pupils sidle by with barely a glance.

The multiculturalism starts early so you don’t know anything else.

The benefits include small classes, capacity to save, private healthcare, free flights home and no Ofsted

No anal sex classes in Year 1? Bigots.

The school is discreet about alumni – apart from the Mexican Nobel laureate Mario J Molina, after whom the school’s science centre is named – but it is happy for you to know it includes European royalty and Silicon Valley entrepreneurs.

Degeneracy for thee but not for me.

Besides, here there’s less time spent managing behaviour and more time doing what teachers love – teaching their subject. At home, he says, his work was results- and Ofsted-driven. Here he feels he can be more creative, more independent. “In the UK you are constantly having to report to certain people about certain things. Here you are trusted to do what you think is best for the student.”

Socialist complains about socialism.

Can we rescind their citizenship? We trained them up and they fled.

Eilish McGrath is head of social studies at Rosenberg and echoes McCarron’s sentiments. She began her teaching career at Hathershaw college in Oldham, a comprehensive with a large number of disadvantaged pupils, followed by a sixth-form college in Macclesfield. She enjoyed the work, but having spent much of her childhood in the Middle East and Asia, she moved to Dubai, where she taught at Repton school, one of a growing number of British independent schools that are opening international branches overseas.

They not only don’t care about you, they fund and train up your invaders.

Often exhausted by their experiences in the UK, they complain of excessive workload, stress, a lack of work-life balance, funding cuts, a dread of Ofsted, an obsession with paperwork, accountability measures, poor behaviour, children bringing weapons to school, high staff turnover … the list goes on.

The benefits of working abroad, they say, don’t just include sunshine, free accommodation and tax-free earnings, but small classes, more resources, better work-life balance, freedom to travel, capacity to save, private healthcare, free flights home and no Ofsted. Their strength of feeling is eye-opening. “I would burn in hell before returning to teach in an English school,” says one teacher who moved to the Netherlands. “Teaching in the UK is exhausting,” says a secondary school art and design teacher who moved to an international school in Thailand.

Yeah can we just trap these people there and wait for the next war or plague?

Though few of the teachers who contact us are motivated by money, one 33-year-old left her primary school in Tower Hamlets, east London, for an international school in Yangon in Myanmar because she couldn’t make enough money to survive in London. Now she earns £5,000 more, plus a yearly bonus, in a package topped off with free accommodation, flights and medical insurance. “Working conditions are better, with sizes that are half of a UK class. It would be insane for me to return to the UK.”

Can we make that official?

Fifth columnists, they vote in our ruin and replacement then skip the country.

Janet Birch, a science teacher, left the UK for Two Boats, the government school on Ascension Island, a British Overseas Territory in the south Atlantic. In her north London secondary, she felt that the workload was excessive, pupils were poorly behaved, resources were tight and the job was stressful. “I could be earning more in England but I would not be able to save as much,” she says. She described her new situation: “The pupils are delightful, the classes are small, resources are plentiful, workload is reasonable, staff work well together.” Island life suits her – she dives, walks and is a projectionist for the local cinema.

r-types

The alarm bells have been ringing for some time about the exodus from our classrooms. One poll by the National Education Union (NEU) this year found that one in five teachers (18%) expects to quit in less than two years, and two in five want to quit in the next five – most blame “out of control” workload pressures and excessive accountability.

Socialism.

“We know that teachers have a strong social mission and they want to make the world a better place, and work with disadvantaged children,” says Mary Bousted, joint general secretary of the NEU. “But the reality is we are making teaching just too hard to do.”

It’s babysitting! They do nothing!

They get solid months off per year.

When these people come back and bitch about state pensions, remember this.

Louise Sturt, an English teacher with 25 years experience in the state sector in England, would agree. She finally quit her comprehensive near Bristol after years of funding cuts, restructuring and deteriorating behaviour.

“dogwhistles” aplenty in this article

they know, they know what the low iq nations are like they just want to be somewhere else when the riots happen to you

Staff numbers had been reduced dramatically, she says. She now works at the private Dubai English Speaking college. “We’ve got a nice place to live. We’ve got sunny days every day. It feels like an adventure.” After so many years in state education, she feels sad she has finally “gone over to the other side. I would go back to it. There are not that many people I speak to who would.”

On the other side of the planet, Katy Bull is thriving in her role as head of kindergarten in a small international school in Tequisquiapan, a popular tourist town in central Mexico. “I remember spending weekends in the UK sat inside planning, marking, assessing, worrying … Now I actually have a life. I would still say I work extremely hard, but extremely hard on the things that count. I feel intrinsically motivated to be an outstanding teacher, and not because Ofsted inspectors are pressuring me.”

Omg you big meanie Ofsted expecting them to jump through your hoops for a wage.

Bloody snowflakes.

[Ofsted are dodgy, pedo-pushing and do fake things in their documents and lie to cover up for child abuse though.]

Modern foreign language teacher Mary McCormack, who quit her job at a school in Wolverhampton for Canada, has similar memories of weekends and “the piles of books that needed to be corrected every three weeks – robbing me of my Sundays”.

You got summers and other holidays off but you’re not a farmer, you don’t need summers off.

And in Quebec? “Little to no lesson observations. Complete trust as a professional. I am paid more, but the high taxes mean that my take-home is slightly less than what it would be in the UK. This being said, I would never consider coming back to a British classroom.”

Could demographics have anything to do with that?

In the run-up to a general election in which education is likely to be a key battleground, all parties have pledged more money for schools. The Tories have promised increased starting salaries for teachers of £30,000, while Labour pledged an end to high-stakes school inspections, but whether any of it is enough to stem the exodus of teachers remains to be seen.

Ofsted has lied about child abuse and covered it up, what stakes?

They have a Common Purpose, you could say.

Prof John Howson, an authority on the labour market for teachers, says it is classroom teachers with between five and seven years’ experience that are being lost in greater numbers than ever – the very people who should be moving into middle leadership positions. And while once upon a time they might have gone abroad to work in the international sector temporarily, Howson fears these days they may prefer what they find overseas and not return.

A capitalist system?

What’s more, a significant increase in the number of secondary school pupils is projected over the next few years.

with sub-replacement native birth rate, no prizes for guessing why they fled

This means we will need more teachers, not fewer, just at the time the international schools market is booming and will be trying to lure British teachers in ever greater numbers to fill its classrooms overseas. According to the Council of British International Schools, the sector will require up to 230,000 more teachers to meet staffing needs over the next 10 years. “I fear that we may have to go looking elsewhere around the world for teachers to come and work here,” says Howson.

the solution to problems caused by Third World immigration – more Third World immigration!

That’s Owen Jones tier reasoning.

The champagne socialists could just be banned from leaving or coming back. That’s the solution.

This is also why they want open borders. They can afford to run from the diversity, you can’t!

In Switzerland, McGrath contemplates a different future, away from the exclusive surroundings of the Institut auf dem Rosenberg, back to her classroom in Oldham. “Would I go back and teach in the UK?” She sits back and reflects. “When I worked in Oldham, I really liked the challenges of the students I was working with. Now working here, I would find it very hard to go back.”

Racist bigot. Obviously.

Teachers are just the new, secular missionaries, utterly useless people who should be shipped off abroad and never let back in. We used to let our rabbits go off to Africa, get malaria and die there. That was a smarter system.

comment

The person who solves the problem of the poor behaviour of the 5% of pupils, solves the recruitment crisis.

IQ is mostly genetic, just deport them and the family.

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I’d have thought Guardian folk would detest schools like Rosenberg. And this from the paper that rails against private education. By all means point out the inadequacies of Ofsted etc but giving voice to Guardian reading teachers who have left UK comprehensives to teach at private schools abroad smacks of hypocrisy. You would also do well to focus some of your journalistic energies to the problems of pupil behaviour – mentioned here by several teachers.

They’re hypocrites.

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My word, the hostility below the line here is quite something.

How dare British teachers decide to leave behind their crumbling, underfunded schools, excessive workload, undisciplined kids (discipline starts at home, folks, whether you want to accept that or not), crap salaries, crippling bureaucracy and being used as a political football, in order to go elsewhere to pursue the profession that they actually signed up to do?

Do not pity these people whatever happens to them.

This is another negative to our short term thinking, we use student loans to take the expansion of the universities in this country of our government books but this just means that graduates have another incentive to leave.

as long as they can’t vote or come back when SHTF with exotic diseases in their system then fine

Asia has a syphilis problem and have you read the fatal symptoms of that one? All it takes is one set of antibiotics to fail, like super gonorrhea beforehand.

Why come back when staying away means that in a few years time the taxpayer will pay off your student loan instead?

It’s cute they think they’ll be allowed back to sponge off the pension system after paying no taxes.

Should we abolish tenure?

  1. Replace with robots.
  2. Bring back moral standards.
  3. Snatch their pensions (must anyway, for national debt). Commies hate saving.
  4. Easier firing.
  5. Student feedback system.
  6. Any sexual misconduct and you’re gone.
  7. Single-sex schools, mostly solves 6.
  8. Tenure has age requirement and it’s high.
  9. Out of office signalling is to be discouraged.
  10. MOOCs for the basic shit.
  11. Make singletons exempt from paying for public schools (singlism already could do this), unless they want to.
  12. No summers off. None of you work a farm, you don’t need summers off.
  13. Atheists must work over the holidays. Hoist by their own petard.
  14. Most of their concepts have failed, let the students disagree without getting marked down.
  15. No grading on a curve, this doesn’t treat the students as individuals (snowflakes) and is sexist/racist/whatever.

 

The myth of austerity (UK)

https://www.ukpublicspending.co.uk/uk_national_spending_analysis

The raw, REAL* amount of what we literally spend in GBP (£).

You see that red bar? That means it’s going UP.

Real is the technical term for that chart.

As a % of GDP, we’re spending as much as the last Labour government.

2010 is when the Tories got in. Note that spending went up.

If you want to know why it’s been forced to stabilize, the notion of slagflation might come in handy.
GDP has sucked.

https://www.ons.gov.uk/economy/grossdomesticproductgdp/timeseries/ihyq/pgdp

This is why the Tories got in. This is not temporary.

https://www.ukpublicspending.co.uk/past_spending

I think this chart’s my favourite. Longitudinal data of economic parasitism.

Guardian readers citing stats out of historical context to make history-based arguments are hilarious.
Austerity spending is a contradiction in terms. Balanced budgeting is no more a bad thing than an addict complaining you’ve stopped enabling him. The inflation is caused by extant liabilities we must continue to pay out for; we can scarcely afford current welfare etc. (not including pensions, which we can never afford as unfunded). Let alone to add new ones in like a student with Daddy’s credit card during Fresher’s Week. The money simply isn’t there and it never will be. Pensions must be funded first. The economy is stagnant as you saw by GDP, we’re barely breaking even and this was a long-term plateau long before Brexit. Compared to other countries, like the US I was duffing up yesterday, we’re actually doing okay.

Public spending for “Social Protection” started at 0.7 percent of GDP in 1900 and has now reached over 15 percent of GDP.

But it’s the military dragging us down, right?
We must stop funding attack helicopters, shouldn’t we, Sue, 57, from Brighton?

https://www.ukpublicspending.co.uk/uk_defence_spending_30.html

In terms of Gross Domestic Product UK defence spending was 2.85 percent of GDP in 2000. But from 2002 to 2009 defence spending was constant at about 2.65-2.70 percent GDP. Since the Great Recession, defence spending been in steady decline, breaking below 2.4 percent GDP in 2016.

Read it and weep you intellectually dishonest douches.

https://www.ukpublicspending.co.uk/uk_total_spending_pie_chart

Welfare (NOT including pensions) is more than DOUBLE military expenses.

General 2%
Transport 4%
Protection 4%
Welfare 14%
Defence 6%
Education 11%
Health Care 18%
Pensions 20%
Interest 7%
Other 15%.

I know you’re allergic to maths but bar charts and pie charts are kiddie tier.

https://www.theguardian.com/education/2016/dec/06/english-schools-core-subject-test-results-international-oecd-pisa

Education, for example, we suck at harder than ever.
The schools that still teach (by rote) are killing us.

Here to agree with me is famed conservative Paul Krugman.

https://www.theguardian.com/business/ng-interactive/2015/apr/29/the-austerity-delusion

He supposedly thinks austerity is BS and it shouldn’t even be tried because it won’t work. He thinks it’s a myth too.

“But won’t this lead to budget deficits? Yes, and that’s actually a good thing.”

This is how you can tell Krugman isn’t actually an economist or economist isn’t actually a job. Numerical psychic is not a job.

” in effect, an economy in which the public is trying to save more than businesses are willing to invest. In such an economy the government does everyone a service by running deficits and giving frustrated savers a chance to put their money to work. “

You can’t put money to work when nobody wants to work with it.
That is what investment literally is. Random spending isn’t investment.
I don’t invest in half a dozen shots, I blow it. Investments are carefully calculated for perceptible gains. Not moral gains, actual fiscal cash in the bank gains.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/debate/article-4634536/PETER-OBORNE-myth-austerity.html

“However, I accept that this week’s Queen’s Speech does contain one very serious flaw: it marks the moment when the British Government abandoned any serious attempt to control spending.”

“There is, in fact, no limit to the proposals for public spending put forward by Jeremy Corbyn and his front bench, who are clearly basing their economics on the existence of ‘magic money trees’.

Suddenly, the dominating narrative in public life is that, instead of trying to live within our means as a nation, we should cast off ‘austerity’.”

The Guardian’s battle screech.

That aside, now that Britain’s so-called austerity has become the focus of intense debate, it is important to expose the myth that the nation’s finances have been cut to the bone under the Tories. That suggestion is nonsense — for the simple reason that there has been very little austerity at all.

Last week, Sir Nicholas Macpherson, Permanent Secretary at the Treasury from 2005-2016, wrote an exceptionally important article for the Financial Times. He noted that gross public debt actually rose as a proportion of national income between 2010 and 2016, from 76 per cent to 89 per cent.

As Sir Nicholas wrote: ‘Britain never experienced austerity.’ As someone who ran Britain’s most important financial institution for 11 years, he is in a position to know.

It’s fake news.

between 2010 and 2016, from 76 per cent to 89 per cent.”

Again, 2010 – the year the Tories got in. Since the Tory Party got in, +13% has already been spent. That is a 100% true statement.

I love it when new guys assume I can’t math.

Why do you think my predictions work out? They’re not opinions.

You know what has been good for the economy?

Brexit!

https://www.ft.com/content/cf51e840-7147-11e7-93ff-99f383b09ff9

It is still too early to to say that Brexit has damaged the performance of the economy because the slowdown might reverse once the squeeze on incomes passes.

What would the FT know?
We haven’t actually left yet. The Left predicted we’d all be eating our pets like Venezuela by now. Marginal growth is still going up!

The EU waits to see our terms of disengagement. Then the investments will flow.

Savings?

The decline also reflects an error that the Office for National Statistics has identified that understated incomes in its data, which is due to be rectified soon.

Since when did Communists care about savings they can’t steal?

The cause of the decline in living standards is more closely linked to a rise in inflation rather than a fall in average wage growth, but both have played a part. And with social security benefits for non-pensioners frozen, real income growth is also likely to have fallen.

Labour market is still saturated with EU workers’ competition. Cannot be called yet.

Every indicator of the number of people in the labour market has been positive since the EU referendum. The unemployment and underemployment rates are down, while participation in the labour market, the employment rate and vacancies are all up.

See?

With such a clear and positive picture, the best data are simply the headline unemployment rate, which has fallen from 4.9 per cent to 4.5 per cent in the past year, to reach its lowest level since 1975.

Maths is hard for Commies, especially when it doesn’t go the way they hoped (which it always does).

In recent months the gap between the world’s two most important currencies diverged as the euro gained against a weakening dollar. Sterling has also gained, but not as much. 

Which economy isn’t totally fucking itself over with immigrated dead weight?
It’s a long game, padre.

Recently

https://www.theguardian.com/business/live/2017/nov/08/chinese-exports-trade-trump-us-banks-brexit-uk-economy-business-live

UK firms expect higher pay rises, as Brexit hits investment plans – as it happened

Exactly as I predicted. More workers making money, oh no!

Why? Stable currency. Exactly as I predicted. The EU is doomed largely from the Eurozone.

Don’t believe me? Despite ever-expanding debt, they’re predicting growth.
Magical pixie growth.

https://www.theguardian.com/business/live/2017/nov/09/german-trade-surplus-uk-housing-market-cools-vauxhall-jobs-business-live

EC slashes UK growth forecasts but sees best eurozone growth in a decade – business live

European Commission says Brexit uncertainty will hurt UK investment, but the rest of Europe is doing ‘significantly better than expected’”

Well I see no reason for bias in that sentence!
Meanwhile, someone a little more objective.

https://www.ft.com/content/cb8bc258-4510-11e6-9b66-0712b3873ae1

IMF downgrades eurozone growth post-Brexit

http://www.xe.com/currencycharts/?from=EUR&to=GBP&view=10Y

This is what you’re celebrating?eurgdp10y.png

Let’s compare to the reserve currency so you can really see what I mean.

eurusd10y

Yes, so strong… such growth, much potential…

giggle-lol-haha

While America is screwed, nobody is as screwed as the EU/Eurozone.

titanic EU lightsout#2big2fail

A little known and very recent piece of news, which should be making headlines but isn’t, while negotiations are ongoing.

https://fp.brecorder.com/2017/11/20171109233563/

The eurozone’s top bank supervisor, Daniele Nouy, on Tuesday urged the sector to press ahead with cross-border mergers, arguing tie-ups would help forge a stronger European finance industry.

If it’s already strong….
Don’t bother with logic.

Have you ever run in a three-legged race? They’re essentially arguing that if you yoke a lame man to a fit one, the lame one will be fit. This is formally known as magical thinking and colloquially known as “batshit insane”.

The theoretical term is Communism.
No, really. This principle is international collectivism. Marx never said that was possible but whatever, why let that stop them, surely they know Marxism better than Marx.
https://www.vocabulary.com/dictionary/collectivism
It is.
The cognitive dissonance of objecting to national state power because it’s too big and corrupt while advocating for supranational state infrastructure.
https://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Communism
“This society would be based on the common ownership”
This requires dissolving national borders and class boundaries. The former is easier than the latter, because, as we know from HBD, class is largely genetic (see intergenerational studies). Maybe that’s why they always shoot people, because the productive won’t just get down and act quietly parasitic like their fellow countrymen. What treason. It isn’t as if humans evolve and continue to mutate and diversify at different rates in myriad ways, is it? Don’t be absurd, we’re interchangeable cogs, that is totally respectful of our human rights and special snowflakeness (the sudden explosion of the latter in the young is culturally related to the popularity of the former position) i.e. no cogs are allowed to be sparkly.
https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/collectivism

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/iain-duncan-smith-eu-communist-a6901211.html

“The EU was set up by the founding fathers, an important man called [Altiero] Spinelli, an Italian, who was an ex-communist, he designed the Maastricht Treaty and the Single European Act, why?

Is there any such thing as an ex-Communist?
[No.]

“He said because this is a political project, bringing the nations of Europe closer and closer together to create a place called Europe and the design of this was such that politicians who come and go could not actually override this decisions of the bureaucracy because otherwise we would never get there.”

Opposing democracy? Lovely.

https://www.vocabulary.com/dictionary/dictatorship
Dictatorship implies absolute power — one person who takes control — of a political situation”

Despots order things. The EU has done this.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/comment/3707704/Undemocratic-EU-bullies-Ireland-into-another-vote.html

https://www.vocabulary.com/dictionary/Caesarism
https://www.vocabulary.com/dictionary/totalitarianism
“If the government has complete and absolute power over the people, that’s totalitarianism. This is a repressive, unfree type of society.”

That can’t be legal? Already is, babycakes.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sovereignty
https://legal-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/sovereignty

Over democracy, what does the EU have?

The doctrine of supremacy. It isn’t even hiding the Orwell there.

https://www.lawteacher.net/free-law-essays/administrative-law/doctrine-of-supremacy-of-european-union-administrative-law-essay.php

In a series of important rulings the European Court of Justice (ECJ) has developed the doctrine of supremacy of European Union (EU) over national law.

trans. Over national populations.

EU law is absolutely supreme even over provisions of national constitutions.

No voting out of this one.

They changed the wikipedia page when the Brexit referendum was announced.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Primacy_of_European_Union_law

It used to be Supremacy. You can still find it via search.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Supremacy

Click through to see…

But I’m totally imagining things, right?

http://www.express.co.uk/news/world/841539/EU-news-European-Union-fourth-reich-Germany-communism-Poland

Krzysztof Karoń, Polish publicist, spoke on Telewizja Republika where he accused the European Union of writing its “communist agenda” into its own laws.

He said: “In March this year the European Commission signed its white paper, which was dubbed the Rome Declaration.

“The only binding manifesto of the EU became the communist manifesto from 1941.”

“It is written in the programme that ‘the first goal is to erase borders dividing Europe into sovereign states’ and that ‘every single undertaking must be verified under this first point’.”

He underlined that in his view this is the root of all political problems sweeping through the continent.

Ridiculous?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eurocommunism

I wrote this today because a lot of this is new today.

GUARDIANISTA, GREAT NEWS!

Don’t worry about austerity, we never had it.

“You can do anything” parenting and teaching is actively harmful

http://aeon.co/magazine/psychology/why-telling-kids-to-dream-big-is-a-big-con/

It comes down to IQ grade. IQ denialism, as it was suggested by Haidt, makes about as much sense now as New Earth Creationism in biology, there is simply so much evidence.

Grades are just proxies for IQ — which most parents are too dumb to conceive of.

IQ isn’t strictly a number, it’s a grouping with an error variance. The Binet IQ was intended for school application ONLY – to ascertain how the child’s learning process could be assisted by teachers at each stage (level of work compared to their chronological age), look at modern Sets for the truest application.

If you’re at the top grouping possible for a human, as an adult, A+/200+ High Genius or basic polymath, you have all the choices. And who doesn’t want options for their child (and by ego extension, a compliment to their own genetic material) but the further down the pyramid you go, the more restricted your future prospects. These are facts.

If you wanna be an astronaut, you’d better be making As and Bs. Just because you sat in the same classroom for decades doesn’t mean you’re equal in life quality potential or entitled to the same things as adults (public school kids and pronounced failures regardless of family fortune are the amusing example).

Telling children they all have equal potential may seem nice, and the Nurture Brigade of modern teaching insist it’s fair (if you are ignorant of their status yes, in case) and necessary (see former) – but it traumatizes the average and below-average children and sets them up for a lifetime of suffering, and probable mental illness (hark! Freud’s ghost laughing in the distance). Children blame themselves when they fail or something goes wrong. Fine if the changes needed are within their control… this is rarely the case here.  The self-esteem movement formed to prevent mental illness, theoretically as a shield against it, and now… many young people are popping pills.

This lie about potential doesn’t even sink in (because for this to apply, they are dumb) when they’re adults. Millennials are miserable. They see their age-peers succeed and assume (all else being equal) there is something they can do about it, and feel entitled (+) or wronged (-), that their own course isn’t going the same way (a few come up with lies i.e. their competition is cheating, or secretly evil).

n.b. IQ is computed by age, so child ones are unreliable although age 11/12 is highly correlated, it’s best to get retested as an adult and expect a small dive. Many supposed prodigies fail on this count because they were merely ahead of the curve at school (by external factors of socialisation, see Gladwell’s Outliers), and not genetically ahead (permanently ahead). Hence, prodigies seem to burn out, when in fact the fakes (harsh but true) merely crash into the wall of their genetic potential. Elements of the modern school system e.g. obedience to popular belief, lack of imagination and rote memory dependence also contribute to this false-flagging of intelligence, as it were, rewarding traits which are, in effect, the anti-genius. Lies on the other side of the IQ fence.

PC teaching method is inferior to traditional, study finds

http://www.breitbart.com/Breitbart-London/2014/10/31/Teaching-Report-Tradition-Best-in-Classroom

The report, What Makes Great Teaching, commissioned by the Sutton Trust and Durham University takes aim at “inefficient” and “ineffective” fashionable teaching methods such as “child centred learning” and “discovery learning”, which it claims is retarding the progress of young people in schools. It praises traditional, efficient methods and the establishment of clear rules for classroom behaviour, and anticipates the potential anger among the teaching community the report could generate.

…The report also rejected the modern notion that students needed regular praise and boosts to their self-worth to succeed. In reality, it is claimed, constant praise encourages complacency among learners. Indicating to a student that more is expected of them through disapproval of performance instead produces the desired effect: “For low-attaining pupils, praise… meant to be encouraging and protective can actually convey a message of low expectations.

…Ultimately, the report concludes that the most important element that makes a good teacher is not their use of fashionable teaching methods, but “strong knowledge and understanding of their subject” which shows “strong evidence of impact on student outcomes”.

The least important aspects that contribute to good teaching are “teacher beliefs”, which includes their knowledge of teaching theory and “conceptual models”, and “professional beliefs” which includes “reflecting on and developing professional practice”. In comparison to teacher knowledge, these practices only show “some evidence” of improving students.

The findings appear to vindicate the efforts of former Education Secretary Michael Gove to reform the UK’s schools system. In September 2013, he said modern methods of teaching were contributing to the “sidelining of the teacher from the activity of learning” and that “theorists have consistently argued for ways of organising classrooms and classroom activity which reduce the teacher’s central role in education”.

Mr. Gove said: “Allied to these teaching methods which have nothing to do with passing on knowledge, there has also been an emphasis on teachers having to put their own learning aside so that work is ‘relevant’ to the students. This has resulted in the dumbing of educational material down to the level of the child – with GCSE English papers that ask students about Tinie Tempah, or Simon Cowell – rather than encouraging the child to thirst after the knowledge of the teacher”.

The Guardian reports the comments of one deputy headmaster who expressed concerns that the valuable conclusions of the report would be lost unless teachers took heed. He said: “Until teachers, school leaders – and perhaps vitally, Ofsted inspectors – are brought up to speed with the latest developments, the impact will be limited”.